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Stones

Stone Names

Cubic Zirconia

AAA Grade CZ AAA Grade CZ AAA Grade CZ is a manmade stone, in which its refractive index, dispersion and hardness is extremely close to those of a natural diamond. It also creates more flashes of color, giving it a fiery and brilliant appearance.
Cracked CZ Cracked CZ Cracked CZ is a form of cubic zirconia, its appearance modified to look as if it is cracked on the inside, and therefore giving it the name cracked CZ.
Milky CZ Milky CZ Milky CZ is another form of cubic zirconia, altered to make its form look milky. It comes in various colors, and can be cut into any shape.

Crystal / Quartz

Amethyst Amethyst Amethyst is a type of quartz that is mostly found in geodes and hollow agates. It is composed of silicon dioxide, and scores a 7 on the Mohs hardness scale. From different angles, amethyst occurs in primary hues from a light pinkish violet to a deep purple.
Citrine Citrine Citrine is a variety of quartz whose color ranges from a pale yellow to brown due to ferric impurities. Natural citrines are rare, and most commercial citrines are heat-treated amethysts or smoky quartzes.
Rose Quartz Rose Quartz Rose Quartz is a type of quartz which exhibits a pale pink to rose red hue. The color is usually considered as due to trace amounts of titanium, iron, or manganese, in the compound stone.
Smoky Quartz Smoky Quartz Smoky Quartz is a grey and translucent variety of quartz. It ranges in clarity from almost complete transparency to a brownish-gray crystal that is almost opaque. Like other quartz gems, it is a silicon dioxide crystal. It was not commonly used in the ancient times, but it has recently become a popular gemstone used for jewelry.
Spinel Spinel Spinel is the magnesium aluminum member of the larger spinel group of minerals. Its hardness is 8, its specific gravity is 3.5–4.1, and it is transparent to opaque with a vitreous to dull luster. It may be colorless, but is usually various shades of red, blue, green, yellow, brown, or black.

Micro/Crypto-Crystalline

Agate Agate Agate is a cryptocrystalline variety of silica, chiefly chalcedony, characterized by its fineness of grain and brightness of color. Although agates may be found in various kinds of rock, they are classically associated with volcanic rocks and can be common in certain metamorphic rocks.
Onyx Onyx Onyx is a banded variety of the oxide mineral chalcedony. The colors of its bands range from white to almost every color (with the exception of some shades, such as purple or blue). Commonly, specimens of onyx contain bands of black and/or white.
Cat's Eye Cat's Eye Cat's Eye Translucent yellowish chatoyant chrysoberyl is called cymophane or cat's eye. Gems lacking the silky inclusions required to produce the cat's eye effect are usually faceted. An alexandrite cat's eye is a chrysoberyl cat's eye that changes color.
Tiger's Eye Tiger's Eye Tiger's Eye is a chatoyant gemstone that is usually a metamorphic rock that is a golden to red-brown color, with a silky luster. Its hardness on the Mohs scale is 5.5-6, and its specific gravity is 2.64-2.71.

Feldspar

Lapis Lapis Lapis is a deep blue semi-precious stone prized since antiquity for its intense color. The intense blue color is due to the presence of the trisulfur (S3) radical anion in the crystal. Lapis lazuli is a rock whose most important mineral component is lazurite. Most lapis lazuli also contains calcite (white), sodalite (blue), and pyrite (metallic yellow). Lapis takes an excellent polish and can be made into jewelry, carvings, boxes, mosaics, ornaments, small statues, and vases.
Moonstone Moonstone Moonstone is a sodium potassium aluminum silicate. Its name is derived from a visual effect, or sheen, caused by light diffraction within a microstructure consisting of a regular succession of feldspar layers. It is composed of two feldspar species, orthoclase and albite.
Oligoclase Oligoclase Oligoclase is a rock-forming mineral belonging to the plagioclase feldspars. The Mohs hardness is 6-6.5 and the specific gravity is 2.64-2.66. In color it is usually white, with shades of grey, green, or red.
Sodalite Sodalite Sodalite is a rich royal blue tectosilicate mineral widely used as an ornamental gemstone. It is a member of the sodalite group with hauyne, nosean, lazurite and tugtupite. A light, relatively hard yet fragile mineral, sodalite is named after its sodium content; in mineralogy it may be classed as a feldspathoid. Well known for its blue color, sodalite may also be grey, yellow, green, or pink and is often mottled with white veins or patches.

Ore

Garnet Garnet Garnets are a group of silicate minerals that have been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives. All species of garnets possess similar physical properties and crystal forms, but differ in chemical composition. Garnet species are found in many colors including red, orange, yellow, green, purple, brown, blue, black, pink, and colorless, with reddish shades most common. The mineral group shows a range of hardness on the Mohs scale of about 6.5-7.5.
Hematite Hematite Hematite also spelled as haematite, is the mineral form of iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3). It forms a complete solid solution at temperatures above 950 °C (1,740 °F). Hematite is a mineral, colored black to steel or silver-gray, brown to reddish brown, or red. Huge deposits of hematite are found in banded iron formations. Gray hematite is typically found in places that can have still standing water or mineral hot springs. Hematite can also occur without water, however, usually as the result of volcanic activity.
Malachite Malachite Malachite is a copper carbonate hydroxide mineral. Malachite often results from weathering of copper ores and is often found together with azurite, goethite, and calcite. Except for its vibrant green color, the properties of malachite are similar to those of azurite and aggregates of the two minerals occur frequently.
Marcasite Marcasite Marcasite The mineral marcasite, sometimes called white iron pyrite, is iron sulfide (FeS2) with orthorhombic crystal structure. On fresh surfaces it is pale yellow to almost white and has a bright metallic luster. It tarnishes to a yellowish or brownish color and gives a black streak. It is a brittle material that cannot be scratched with a knife. It typically forms under low-temperature highly acidic conditions.
Opal Opal Opal is a hydrated amorphous form of silica. It is deposited at a relatively low temperature and may occur in the fissures of almost any kind of rock, being most commonly found with limonite, sandstone, rhyolite, marl, and basalt. Precious opal ranges from clear through white, gray, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, magenta, rose, pink, slate, olive, brown, and black. Of these hues, the black opals are the rarest, whereas white and greens are the most common.
Ruby / Corundum Ruby / Corundum Ruby / Corundum is a crystalline form of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) typically containing traces of iron, titanium, vanadium and chromium. It is one of the naturally transparent materials, but can have different colors when impurities are present. Transparent specimens are used as gems, ruby if red and padparadscha if pink-orange. All other colors are called sapphire, e.g., "green sapphire" for a green specimen. Because of corundum's hardness (pure corundum is defined to have 9.0 Mohs), it can scratch almost every other mineral.
Rutile Rutile Rutile is a mineral composed primarily of titanium dioxide. Rutile has among the highest refractive indices at visible wavelengths of any known crystal, and also exhibits a particularly large birefringence and high dispersion. Small rutile needles present in gems are responsible for an optical phenomenon known as asterism. Asteriated gems are known as "star" gems. Star sapphires, star rubies, and other "star" gems are highly sought after and are generally more valuable than their normal counterparts.
Turquoise Turquoise Turquoise is an opaque, blue-to-green mineral that is a hydrated phosphate of copper and aluminum. It is rare and valuable in finer grades and has been prized as a gem and ornamental stone for thousands of years owing to its unique hue. The finest of turquoise reaches a maximum hardness of just under 6, or slightly more than window glass. The luster of turquoise is typically waxy to sub vitreous, and transparency is usually opaque, but may be semi translucent in thin sections. Color is as variable as the mineral's other properties, ranging from white to a powder blue to a sky blue, and from a blue-green to a yellowish green.

Fossil

Amber Amber Amber is fossilized tree resin (not sap), which has been appreciated for its color and natural beauty since Neolithic times. Much valued from antiquity to the present as a gemstone, amber is made into a variety of decorative objects. The abnormal development of resin in living trees (succinosis) can result in the formation of amber. Inclusions of other substances can cause amber to have an unexpected color. Pyrites may give a bluish color. Bony amber owes its cloudy opacity to numerous tiny bubbles inside the resin.
Conch Conch Conch is a common name that is applied to a number of different medium to large-sized sea snails or their shells. The term generally applies to large snails whose shell has a high spire and a noticeable siphonal canal (in other words, the shell comes to a noticeable point at both ends). Conch jewelry is set with queen conch shells that are precisely cut and polished to the desired design.
Coral Coral Coral Precious coral or red coral is the common name given to Corallium rubrum and several related species of marine coral. The distinguishing characteristic of precious corals is their durable and intensely colored red or pink skeleton, which is used for making jewelry. Red corals grow on rocky sea bottoms with low sedimentation, typically in dark environments—either in the depths or in dark caverns or crevices.
Pearl Pearl Pearl A pearl is a hard object produced within the soft tissue (specifically the mantle) of a living shelled mollusk. Just like the shell of a clam, a pearl is composed of calcium carbonate in minute crystalline form, which has been deposited in concentric layers. The ideal pearl is perfectly round and smooth, but many other shapes (baroque pearls) occur. The finest quality natural pearls have been highly valued as gemstones and objects of beauty for many centuries.

Other

Rhinestone Rhinestone Rhinestone Originally, rhinestones were rock crystals gathered from the river Rhine, hence the name, although some were also found in areas like the Alps, but today the name 'rhinestone' applies only to varieties of lead glass, known as crystal glass . Typically, crystal rhinestones have been used on costumes, apparel and jewelry. Crystal rhinestones are produced mainly in Austria by Swarovski and in the Czech Republic by Preciosa and a few other glassworks in northern Bohemia.
Bronzite Bronzite Bronzite is a member of the pyroxene group of minerals, belonging with enstatite and hypersthene to the orthorhombic series of the group. The color of bronzite is green or brown; its specific gravity is about 3.3–3.4, varying with the amount of iron present. The refractive indices and optic angle increase with iron content. Bronzite is sometimes cut and polished, usually in convex forms, for small ornamental objects. It often has a more-or-less distinct fibrous structure, and when this is pronounced the sheen has a certain resemblance to that of cats-eye.
Jade Jade Jade is an ornamental rock. The term jade is applied to two different metamorphic rocks that are composed of different silicate minerals: nephrite and jadeite. Nephrite and jadeite were used from prehistoric periods for hardstone carving. Jadeite has about the same hardness as quartz. Nephrite is slightly softer, but is tougher (more resistant to breakage) than jadeite.
Acrylic Acrylic Acrylic is an important material used in fashion jewelry and clothing. Due to its transparency, light weight, crumble resistant, low prices and easily manufactured, acrylic is the most commonly used in jewelry and accessories.
Ceramic Ceramic Ceramic is an inorganic, non-metallic, often crystalline oxide, nitride or carbide material. Some elements, such as carbon or silicon, may be considered ceramics. Ceramic materials are brittle, hard, strong in compression, and weak in shearing and tension. They withstand chemical erosion that occurs in other materials subjected to acidic or caustic environments. Ceramics generally can withstand very high temperatures, such as temperatures that range from 1,000 °C to 1,600 °C (1,800 °F to 3,000 °F).
Glass Glass Glass is a non-crystalline amorphous solid that is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative usage. Glass was used extensively during the Middle Ages. Anglo-Saxon glass has been found across England during archaeological excavations of both settlement and cemetery sites. Glass in the Anglo-Saxon period was used in the manufacture of a range of objects including vessels, beads, and windows, and was also used in jewelry.
Glass Bead Glass Bead Glass Bead have been dated back to at least the Roman times. They are usually categorized by the method used to manipulate the glass - wound beads, drawn beads, and molded beads. There are composites, such as millefiori beads, where cross-sections of a drawn glass cane are applied to a wound glass core. A very minor industry in blown glass beads also existed in 19th-century Venice and France.
Resin Resin Resin is a "solid or highly viscous substance," which are typically convertible into polymers. Such viscous substances can be plant-derived or synthetic in origin. They are often mixtures of organic compounds. It is durable and transparent, and starts as a liquid form. After casting, it becomes solid and resilient. Special resin molds with smooth surfaces are created to give it a glossy finish.
Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized minerals or rock grains. Most sandstone is composed of quartz and/or feldspar because these are the most common minerals in the Earth's crust. Like sand, sandstone may be any color, but the most common colors are tan, brown, yellow, red, grey, pink, white, and black.